Works in Progress

November 28th, 2016: Analyzing an Artifact

Artifact:  Blog entry-Be Nice to Mice?

The blog post from September 9th of this semester demonstrates an understanding of rhetorical devices and how arguments are supported using theses devices. The blog entry analyzed two websites that were focused around the use of mice in scientific research. Through comparing and contrasting how the articles persuaded their audience I was able to define why one website conveyed its message better than the other. I analyzed rhetorical situations in the websites. For example, I mentioned in the entry, “NAVS has filed their article with statistics and logos information that is, in fact, very useful and convincing, but not as appealing to my preferences.”. I accentuate that their logos appeal were overwhelming and tended to water down the websites argument against the use of mice in laboratory. By critiquing their use of rhetorical elements, I gained a greater understanding of how to effectively approach an audince to garner support or persuade the reader.

November 1, 2016: Revision of Blog Post

Original: The foundation of her article lies within the story of the Surinam toad. Todd uses this bizarre and rare animal to hook the reader’s attention and support her argument. This foundation gives the reader an irresistible urge to read on. The description of the toad itself may be the most powerful grabber used in the article. Todd describes the birth of its young in a gut wrenching fashion that, as stated, makes you that much more interested in the animal. In my case, I was too captured in the topic that I had to watch the, in fact, gruesome birth of Surinam toads online. However, Todd also provides feedback into other’s curious adventures with the Surinam toad. She uses the history of researcher’s experiences with the toad to show how human curiosity can be generalized to us as a species. Using these examples, Todd does not try to prove to the reader that he or she is a curious person, but shows them that we as humans have a curious desire that must naturally be filled.

Revised: The foundation of her article lies within the story of the Surinam toad. Todd uses this bizarre and rare animal to hook the reader’s attention and support her argument. This foundation gives the reader an irresistible urge to read on. The description of the toad itself may be the most powerful grabber used in the article. Todd describes the birth of the toad’s young in a gut wrenching fashion. In my case, I was too captured in the topic that I had to watch the, in fact, gruesome birth of Surinam toads online. The almost humorous and foul response from the public that had watched the video allows Todd to question the reader: “Given the strength of the recoil, why can’t we look away?” (Todd BASNW). As Todd breaks the fourth wall, she provides the reader with insight into her article early on that gives them hope for solution and interest in the world of curiosity. However, Todd also provides feedback into other’s curious adventures with the Surinam toad. She uses the history of researcher’s experiences with the toad to show how human curiosity can be generalized to us as a species. Using these examples, Todd does not try to prove to the reader that he or she is a curious person, but shows them that we as humans have a curious desire that must naturally be filled.

October 28, 2016: Curious Argument

1. Kim Todd’s argument in the passage Curious is that it is human nature to be curious. There are not certain groups of people that are or are not, but it is a characteristic of humans to dive deeper and be nosy whether or not more information is for better or for worse.

2. When Todd is talking about the birth of the toads from the mother’s back, she mentions that the feeling she had was “a disturbed mirror. Irresistible.” She also uses multiple anecdotes and examples of people being curious (centered around the toad, though).

3. The quote just typifies the feeling humans have when we stumble upon something odd. We have a natural and irresistible desire to find out more and know the reason for why things occur.

Emily Graslie:

1.Graslie’s argument is that curiosity is not  satisfied with more information, but it is fueled by the access of information.

2. Graslie states in the video that we have an “insatiable urge to collect oddities ” that bring happiness and knowledge.

3. From theeee quotes we can find that the urge to learn more is coming from the information that we are absorbing. Just like the renaissance and enlightenment, a little pinch of information spawned a surge of interest.

September 26, 2016: Why Does Solar Power to the People Matter?

The original test is used to inform the public of the solar project that Georgia Tech participated in Haiti. While the Instagram will be informative of the project, it will also have a greater focus on garnering support for the project through pathos rhetorical tactics. This is in part due to the change of audience. The shift from website to social media will alter the audience from a science based, and most likely informed, audience to a broader more elementary audience.

September 21, 2016: Reflection of the MuddyBot Websites

  • One is on the GT website, one is on popular science
    • Popular science has advertisement on it
  • Popular science article is more lighthearted and less scientific
  • Popular Science article has a gif without watching long video
    • GT video is at the top, Popular is at the bottom
  • GT article goes into the history behind the MuddyBot
    • Funding, research, purpose
  • GT article is longer with more detail and background
  • GT includes citations from other sources and universities
    • able to find out more information

The articles are serving different purposes.

September 16,2016: Teresa Reflection

  1. Grading Spinning Science

Rhetorical Awareness: Competent- The photo essay addressed and analyzed rhetorical devices in the advertisement, but provided no unexpected insight into the advertisement’s rhetoric.

Stance: Developing- The essay addressed both sides of the argument (using rhetoric successfully and unsuccessfully). The first few paragraphs were praising the rhetoric used, but the second to last paragraph criticized the use of “clinically proven”.

Development of Ideas: Competent- All evidence was supported with analysis, but some disconnect between the first two bits of evidence and the last one.

Organization: Competent-The photo essay is well organized with in depth analysis following information, yet this tactic is mechanical and predictable.

Conventions: Mature- Uses complex sentence structure and vocabulary with few grammatical or syntactical mistakes.

Design for Medium: Competent- Uses features of an online photo essay to its advantage, including the ability to provide hyperlinks to the advertisement.

2. What I learned about my project.

I learned that I need to focus on making a more creative design that will attract the audience and keep their attention. Also, I think I could use and develop a stronger argument in my work. Lastly I think my work is too predictable and structured: I could think outside the box.

3.Plan for my revision.

I will review what my peer’s reflection has to say about my work. I have also learned a lot from reviewing their works, and I have found tactics that could help improve my rhetorical awareness and stance. I think I can take a stronger stance in my analysis that will develop a stronger purpose of the photoessay.

September 12,2016: Spinning Science-Titleist Ad

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Titleist Golf Ball R&D: Making One Million

Titleist is one of the world’s leading golf equipment manufacturers. Selling everything from shoes to clubs, the company has built a brand that is highly respected in the golf industry. But most importantly, Titleist prides itself in their golf balls using the slogan, “#1 ball in golf”. Titleist golf balls are used by more professionals than any other ball on tour; however, their pride and joy does not come without intensive research, design, and marketing. They share advertisements on print media, television, and  web sources. On their own website, they post short, informational videos about their products to serve as advertisement. These advertisements utilize science and rhetoric to convince the viewer of the Titleist brand. For example, Titleist Research and Development created a video about the research and manufacturing of that number one ball in golf, the ProV1x. The video, “Making One Million”, focuses on the quality and precision of their manufacturing process, and, through science, gives the consumer confidence in the Titleist brand.

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The accountability of the information in “Making One Million” is created with images like the one above. Titleist is showing one of their employees hand inspecting what appears to be a mold of a golf ball. The appearance is the first aspect of the scene that is noticed. Since the man in the video is wearing a lab coat and collared shirt, he is presumed to be either a scientist or somebody with education and reliability in their work. Consumers tend to have the idea that scientists produce reliable information due to their education and knowledge. The advertisement is not clear, but it is very possible he has had higher education and is well equipped to be inspecting the golf balls. Yet, it is not certain, so Titleist is using scientific association as a form of ethos to persuade the consumer to buy their product

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During the above scene in the Titleist advertisement, the company is proving to its customers that they invest quality time and money into their product. The Director of Quality claims that Titleist has “over 90 quality checks that go into the ProV1 and there are over 120 that go into the ProV1x”(1:14). This use of experimental data and procedure not only astonishes the audience of the advertisement, but also shows how extensive the scientific processes are to create the “#1 ball in golf”. Using this logos rhetoric, Titleist is able to justify why their golf ball is superior to others in the market.

screen-shot-2016-09-13-at-8-28-36-pmThe golf ball manufacturing process includes many fascinating techniques and operations, and for this reason, Titleist includes examples in their advertisement. The image displays how advanced the ProV1 and ProV1x manufacturing processes are. Although Titleist does not release the specific process shown in the image above, there is no doubt the consumer would be intrigued. By displaying the complex steps of manufacturing, Titleist is able to prove to the consumer that their equipment is on the cutting edge of quality and performance. And just as a phone or car is sold, the consumer is always willing to buy the best technology to assure performance.

Posted a few months before the release of the new ProV1 and ProV1x, “Making One Million” is a great use of scientific rhetoric. The advertisement uses a base of science and research to incorporate rhetorical devices, such as ethos and logos, into their marketing strategy. With hopes of selling more golf balls, the advertisement serves its purpose of informing the consumer of the Titleist brand while also piquing their interest in the product.

 August 29th, 2016: First Week Common Video Reflection

Describe your process. What steps were most effective? Least?

My process included talking with friends around campus to expand my vison of possible challenges within the WOVEN modes. I also conferred with my girlfriend, because she knows me well enough to find possible obstacles in my communication skills. I then set out to find the best locations to film my project, and how I was going to film and cover all the topics necessary. Lastly I used iMovie and YouTube to produce and publish my video. I think that getting outside opinions is a good way to improve yourself.

What part of your project are you most satisfied with?

I am satisfied with the content of the video. I feel like I put a great amount of effort into what was included in the script. Also, I think the video speaks truth about my level of electronic communication skills and what challenges I will face throughout the semester.

If you could redo any part of the process what would you do?

I would redo the video quality. Next time I will consider renting a camera and microphone instead of using my cell phone. It is important to relay information in an understandable manner, meaning sound and visual quality do not hinder ones ability to understand the content.